Gordonzola - Am I a judge or am I judgemental?

> Recent Entries
> Archive
> Friends
> Profile
> Gordonzola.net

August 13th, 2007


Previous Entry Share Next Entry
08:33 am - Am I a judge or am I judgemental?
I got asked to judge in the American Cheese Society Competition for the first time this year. It was an honor. Even though I've been cheese buying for 13-some years, I was one of the least experienced cheese people in the room.


judging room

There was a staggering amount of cheese to taste. There were 1208 entries this year broken up into 91 categories** making this year's competition the biggest ever in the US. There were 30 judges working in teams of two. I was an Aesthetic Judge which meant I got to be a positive, touchy-feely, point-awarding, good cop. I was teamed with a technical judge who got to be the mean, callous, point-deducting, bad cop. We scored on separate sheets of paper but our points were totaled for each cheese within its category.

See, look what an aesthetic good cheese cop I am:
aesthetic 1

If you've ever noticed (and honestly it's unlikely you have, but it's my job to read labels so I'm speaking from experience here.) and incredibly bland or boring cheese boasting something like "Winner of the Somecountryorasscoiation's Cheese Championship 2002" and said to yourself, "If this cheese was voted the best, that company must sponsor the contest," here's the explanation. Most contests are judged by the technical folks: dairy scientists or very experienced large-scale cheesemakers. Technical proficiency is was is being judged, not necessarily outstanding flavor.

For example, excessive sweetness or bitterness in a cheddar is considered a defect. As a consumer though, that might be what you love about the cheese. Not only is taste subjective on some level, but it is often regional. My technical partner made fun of me, as a Californian, for preferring sweet-tending cheeses more than bitter-tending ones.

The idea of teaming up the technical and aesthetic judges is to get the best of both worlds. Rewarding cheeses that stand out flavor-wise but that are technically well-made enough to be consistent. The technical judges seemed to mostly know one another, often calling each other over to look at some strange mold, or odd cheese formation. They use a non-retail language for cheese that isn't useful for my every day cheese life, but that I find fascinating. So many great words for cheese… close, corky, marred by whey taint…


intense discussion

My partner and I judged 7 categories. As advertised he was efficient, quick and professional. He'd jab the tryer into the cheese, sniff it right away, replug the cheese with the end bit, then take the remaining sample, bend it to test the texture, and put a piece in his mouth. He had his score sheet filled out in seconds. My Technical Judge didn't spit much, but some in the room didn't seem to swallow a single piece.

Me? I sniffed. I tasted. I pondered. Oh, and if you were wondering, I swallow.

Of the 100-120 cheeses I tasted over the two days of category judging, a number were exceptional (a later post will talk about my cheese favorites from the conference). Only 2 or 3 were horrible. Because I'm me, and because I had to be the good cop in the evaluations, let's talk about the bad first.

While out drinking in downtown Burlington, I made a faux pas with one of my favorite cheesemakers. I love the Pure Luck Goat Cheeses but I don't carry 'em because they pretty much sell their whole supply in their local area. Thus, I didn't realize, while describing a cheese I had to spit out because it was so bitter, rancid, and nasty, that she had a cheese entered in that very category. Of course, I had no idea at that moment, since the entries are anonymous, if her cheese had won the category or was the nasty one. Awkwardness ensued.(It wasn't her cheese. In fact, she won a ribbon in that category. Whew!)

As a retailer, I will say that I could recognize a fair number of the cheeses I tasted, certainly more than most of the technical judges or distributors probably could. It certainly didn't affect my ratings though since only one cheese that I sell won its category among the cheeses I was judging. The cheese that I voted for Best of Show I hadn't even heard of before this competition.

The most tragic cheese wasn't in my category and I still don't know who's cheese it was. I didn't taste it, so I can't speak to that, but it was a ripened goat log that had lost it's bottom. Somehow three sides looked beautiful, but the bottom detached itself so much that you could actually spin the cheese all the way around inside it's moldy casing. I don't know that any of us had seen that before. Judges gathered from all over the room. One said, "it looks like goat cheese in a coffin". I, being a positive aesthetic judge, said, "We could market this. It's like those mini cereal boxes that you cut open and add milk." Another aesthetic judge said, "We'll call it Chevre on the Go!"

Oh, cheese humor…

We weren't judging on packaging, indeed, I gave a perfect score to a cheese that came in a wrinkled and taped paper bag, I gave a very good, if not ribbon-worthy, score to a cheese that came in ugly, tight plastic and, I swear, looked like a freezer-burnt dog turd. I can't imagine anyone buying it with that packaging, but it was a good cheese.

And really, though it was a fun thing to do and I learned a lot form being around the technical folks, I wonder how much good contests are for the cheesmakers. We give feedback on the cheeses, but it could be that the producer sells out every piece of their cheese even if the judges say it's too bitter, too pasty or the texture is wrong. The cheeses that were really bad needed a lot more help than could be conveyed on a judging sheet.


I have a white coat too

After tasting our assigned 100-120 cheeses over a day and a half, we weren't done. The first place winners in each category were brought out and we all had to go around the room and try another 80*** dairy products in order to vote on a Best of Show.

I was embarrassed to see that the cheese my partner and I clearly thought was the best in its category had severe rind rot that we couldn't see when using the cheese iron to take the core sample for judging. Still, it tasted damn good.

Given the amount of cheese we were tasting, it seems unlikely that a mild cheese would ever win the competition. A fresh chevre could be absolutely perfect, a cream cheese could be the best you ever tasted, a colby could be executed to perfection, but the aged and assertive cheeses will leave an impression in that setting.

I voted for two of the top three winners, including the Best of Show Leelanau Aged Raclette as my top choice. I used my third vote for a dairy product ( a few cultured milk and butter categories are included in the competition) I knew wouldn't win but that I just couldn't ignore because it was so perfect. Later that night, a technical judge at the bar told me he thought it was technically the best thing there but didn't vote for it because it wasn't a cheese. Fair enough.

What is a little concerning though is that in the past three years, cheeses of fairly similar flavor profiles have won the competition. All are great cheeses, don't get me wrong. But, since the Red Hawk won 4 years ago, it's been all aged, cow's milk cheeses with a tendency towards sweetness. Pleasant Ridge Reserve is more onion-y and gruyere-like, the Cabot bandage-wrapped cheddar is sharper, and the Leelanau the sweetest and most stinky, but they are definitely the types of cheese that I would sell to the same customer. Still, I think we made the right choice among the cheeses we had to choose from. The was the obvious choice for me though there were another 4-5 that I could have used my 2nd and 3rd choices for.

The ACS is starting to try and brand their awards ceremony, selling shelf signs and stickers to retailers so we can tell people that certain cheeses we sell are "ACS award winners", but awards only measure what a small number of people think about something on a certain day. I have had great cheeses at the Festival of Cheese, only to find them totally inconsistent or young when we tried to sell them in our store. I think all the Best of Show winners in my cheese years have been fabulous and worthy of the award, but one should take every award with a grain of sea salt. Still, I would judge again in a second if asked. It was an awesome experience.

By the way, another judge, Sasha Davies has an account of her judging experiences at her fabulous website Cheese By Hand





*The beautiful thing about me writing about the cheese conference a week later is that you won't have to hear me whine about my getting-there travel nightmare. Even I'm bored with that story. This first footnote represents the original, but now deleted, opening paragraphs of this entry.
**If you want to ask, "91 categories! That can't be right. Are you exagerrating again, Gordon?" Then go here and download the pdf.
*** Not ever category had a first place winner. Cumulative points needed to exceed a certain amount to get a blue ribbon.

(45 comments | Leave a comment)

Comments:


[User Picture]
From:purejuice
Date:August 13th, 2007 03:56 pm (UTC)
(Link)
thank you, very interesting. it seems quite honest, too.
[User Picture]
From:purejuice
Date:August 13th, 2007 03:56 pm (UTC)
(Link)
i mean the procedure, not you. because you're always honest.
[User Picture]
From:gordonzola
Date:August 13th, 2007 04:02 pm (UTC)
(Link)
haha. thanks. that is the way I took it.

I can't speak for the early days, but in that room there was a little technical vs. aesthetic tension, but no one stumping for any cheese to win. In fact almost no one talked about their voting even after it was done.

I had no reason to question the integrity of anyone in the room and I love to question integrity. ;)

[User Picture]
From:purejuice
Date:August 13th, 2007 09:12 pm (UTC)
(Link)
i know you do, and if there'd been any to question, i know you'd've been right on it. i'mhappy and impressed that your profession has proved worthy of you, plus it sounds very interesting and lots of fun. party on.
[User Picture]
From:mallorys_camera
Date:August 13th, 2007 04:10 pm (UTC)
(Link)
I love Raclette! Stinky cheese rules!
[User Picture]
From:gordonzola
Date:August 13th, 2007 08:23 pm (UTC)
(Link)
that company has a younger and an older one. The aged one was the winner and is incredible. Good luck ever finding it though. They are very small.
[User Picture]
From:flipping_hades
Date:August 13th, 2007 04:14 pm (UTC)

Chevre puns

(Link)
The one time I've been to the California State Fair, a General Motors sponsorship sign was next to one of the goat pens. I turned to my dad and said "I guess that must be their Chevre au Lait division".






[User Picture]
From:gordonzola
Date:August 13th, 2007 04:47 pm (UTC)

Re: Chevre puns

(Link)
badda-boom!
[User Picture]
From:anarqueso
Date:August 13th, 2007 04:15 pm (UTC)
(Link)
"Flavor profile." I thought we made you promise not to use that. Beermonger and I were just picking on Schmandy about his use of that and "price point" a few days ago.
[User Picture]
From:gordonzola
Date:August 13th, 2007 04:44 pm (UTC)
(Link)
well, I'd only use that in a technical setting. I'm actually going to write about the inevitable encroachment of the flavor wheel in a post later this week.

Price point is a necesary evil but only when talking to reps, never with a customer. I actually use that all the time, upstairs when talking to reps on the phone. That's how I feel about the "flavor profile" too. only with cheesemakers or dairy scientists.
[User Picture]
From:uberconfused
Date:August 13th, 2007 04:32 pm (UTC)
(Link)
I really wish I knew more about cheese.
[User Picture]
From:gordonzola
Date:August 13th, 2007 08:24 pm (UTC)
(Link)
it can be enjoyed on any level. and you probably know more about the cheeses of Eastern Europe than I do.
[User Picture]
From:uberconfused
Date:August 13th, 2007 08:29 pm (UTC)
(Link)
They're not really big on variety here: bialy ser, zolte ser, smoked cheese from the mountain, and then lots of packaged Edam and Gouda at the grocery store.

My friend brought me a big chunk of sharp cheddar from Neal's Yard though. It is so good. I'm trying not to eat it too fast! I'd swear it had horseradish in it.
[User Picture]
From:ubiquity75
Date:August 13th, 2007 04:37 pm (UTC)
(Link)
This is so specific and nerdy, and therefore fascinating and awesome. I love these Stories from the Cheese Trenches.
[User Picture]
From:gordonzola
Date:August 13th, 2007 08:25 pm (UTC)
(Link)
there is no escaping cheese geekery at the cheese conference.
[User Picture]
From:ohmeohmy
Date:August 13th, 2007 04:40 pm (UTC)
(Link)
i realized this weekend that you hold the secrets to the city, when my friend whom i was meeting up with to eat cheese in the park mentioned that you helped him select it. theoretically, you could map everyone's social and romantic paths through their cheesebuying.

just a thought.
[User Picture]
From:gordonzola
Date:August 13th, 2007 04:47 pm (UTC)
(Link)
Women adamantly saying "no raw milk cheese!" has let me know who's pregnant too, sometimes before their own partners do.
[User Picture]
From:ohmeohmy
Date:August 13th, 2007 04:48 pm (UTC)
(Link)
oooh. see?!
[User Picture]
From:uberconfused
Date:August 13th, 2007 08:31 pm (UTC)
(Link)
couldn't they also be experiencing a herpes outbreak?
[User Picture]
From:gordonzola
Date:August 13th, 2007 08:56 pm (UTC)
(Link)
well, they could have any kind of immune system issue. but guessing pregant is a better starting place than saying, "Holy crap, look at those sores!"
[User Picture]
From:ohmeohmy
Date:August 13th, 2007 09:28 pm (UTC)
(Link)
raw milk is a no for immune system issues? why?

one of the cheeses i had saturday was a really nice sharp moldy one. but i forget what it was. i fail at cheese.
[User Picture]
From:gordonzola
Date:August 13th, 2007 09:36 pm (UTC)
(Link)
Western medical doctors in the US are told by the FDA to advise pregant women and people with immune system issues to avoid a number of food products including young raw milk cheese. The worry is that somerthing like listeria, which generally won't kill a healthy adult, may do a lot of damage or kill people in those situations.

The FDA is frightened of raw dairy because pastuerization kills bacteria. Raw milk cheese, obviously, is unpasteurized.

I'm not saying I agree, just telling you what is up with that.

amusingly, and I was gonna write this in a later post, we had two pregnant judges and the conference was amazingly guilt-free zone for pregnant women drinking in moderation too.
[User Picture]
From:gordonzola
Date:August 13th, 2007 09:39 pm (UTC)
(Link)
I should note that pastuerization kills taste-making bacteria too.

Also none of the recalls since I've been a buyer have been for raw milk cheeses. Yet the FDA does not warn against fresh, high moisture pasteurized cheeses even though they are more suceptible to post-production contamination than raw milk cheese is.
[User Picture]
From:chitinous
Date:August 13th, 2007 04:55 pm (UTC)
(Link)
What a great entry! And the pictures are adorable. Lab coats always add a layer of cute - not to infantilize all you serious scientific method people with your adjudicatory gravitas or anything, but awwwww.
From:clynne
Date:August 13th, 2007 06:17 pm (UTC)
(Link)
Lab Coats are the ultimate fashion accessory. They're nerdy, but just a little sexy, because they hint at competency.

They cover up any unpleasant body lumps while still managing to look stylish. Plus, they're light enough not to be annoying while dancing or in crowds, but warm enough for a California winter evening.

Lab coats are great!
[User Picture]
From:gordonzola
Date:August 13th, 2007 08:26 pm (UTC)
(Link)
I should get some for, you know, around town.
[User Picture]
From:chitinous
Date:August 14th, 2007 02:48 am (UTC)
(Link)
Totally! You could rock it on the day to day. Wear one to Zeitgeist and watch the free beer magnetize itself to your paws.
[User Picture]
From:biblionerd_girl
Date:August 13th, 2007 05:36 pm (UTC)
(Link)
I loved this post!
And I thought of you (albeit in a weird, I know this person on LJ way) when I saw news of this conference in the Globe while on vacation on Cape Cod.
[User Picture]
From:gordonzola
Date:August 13th, 2007 08:27 pm (UTC)
(Link)
I hope you think of me in a weird, I know this person on LJ way whenever cheese comes up.
[User Picture]
From:brownstargirl
Date:August 13th, 2007 06:58 pm (UTC)
(Link)
did you get to keep the white coat?
[User Picture]
From:gordonzola
Date:August 13th, 2007 08:13 pm (UTC)
(Link)
a matter of fact, no!
[User Picture]
From:touchyphiliac
Date:August 13th, 2007 09:32 pm (UTC)
(Link)
I like all the dairy scientists crowding around a table.
[User Picture]
From:gordonzola
Date:August 13th, 2007 09:40 pm (UTC)
(Link)
HOTT!
[User Picture]
From:touchyphiliac
Date:August 13th, 2007 09:46 pm (UTC)
(Link)
I concur!!
[User Picture]
From:effluvia
Date:August 13th, 2007 10:40 pm (UTC)

Not to change the subject but...

(Link)
...you are a good-looking man
[User Picture]
From:gordonzola
Date:August 13th, 2007 11:13 pm (UTC)

Re: Not to change the subject but...

(Link)
Thanks, I try to be aesthetic. ;)


(If you only knew how many attempts I had to take to come up with a non-awful self portrait...)
[User Picture]
From:artnoose
Date:August 13th, 2007 11:02 pm (UTC)
(Link)
New band name: "marred by whey taint"
[User Picture]
From:gordonzola
Date:August 13th, 2007 11:11 pm (UTC)
(Link)
It sounds so dirty when you say it.
[User Picture]
From:flipping_hades
Date:August 14th, 2007 06:19 am (UTC)
(Link)
They can double-bill with Shaved Manchego!
From:thisisthenow
Date:August 14th, 2007 12:08 am (UTC)
(Link)
Possibly dumb question, but what's the blue bucket for?

[User Picture]
From:gordonzola
Date:August 14th, 2007 12:41 am (UTC)
(Link)
spit bucket. well, spit and trash and uneaten cheese.
From:thisisthenow
Date:August 14th, 2007 10:42 am (UTC)
(Link)
I thought maybe so (they do the same in winw tasting), but I had to be sure it wasn't your complementary Grab N' Go Take Home Tasty Cheese Pack
[User Picture]
From:nunofthat
Date:August 15th, 2007 07:20 am (UTC)
(Link)
These ACS entries have been great. Good writing. I am loving the Gordon Edgar Aesthetic.

Thanks also for talking about the 'access to pasture' clause, USDA organic and the politics of large vs. small/farmstead yesterday.

Oh, and if you were wondering, I swallow.

As if any of us are surprised!

I giggled.
[User Picture]
From:charmenders
Date:August 17th, 2007 01:22 am (UTC)
(Link)
Whoa. I don't know anyone else who could turn a cheese competition into an exciting bedtime story!

Am I a judge or am I judgemental?
The misspelling in "judgmental" alone answers the question. ;)
[User Picture]
From:gordonzola
Date:May 18th, 2009 05:38 pm (UTC)
(Link)
Damn the lack of spell check in the title section! I will save my error for posterity now that it's been pointed out.

> Go to Top
LiveJournal.com